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The Wednesday Five

In this week’s Wednesday Five:

  1. Camilla Engstrom’s Cartoons Go Out To All The Women Who’ve Endured Bad Sex
  2. Are Corporate Expense Policies Biased Against Women?
  3. Films at the Toronto Film Festival Address Shifting Conversations on Rape and Sexual Assault
  4. The Feminist Pins You Need for Your Fall Jacket
  5. from the Women’s Voices Archives: ‘The Male Muse, Depicted by Women’

 

1.

Camilla Engstrom’s Cartoons Go Out To All The Women Who’ve Endured Bad Sex

 

#justsaying

A photo posted by Camilla Engstrom (@camillamengengstrom) on Jun 27, 2016 at 4:36pm PDT

Credit: instagram.com/camillamengengstrom

We came across a lovely feature on Sweden-born, Brooklyn-based artist Camilla Engstrom in The Huffington Post this week. Arts writer Priscialla Frank shares how Engstrom’s series, Clit Queen came to be:

The Clit Queen is but one of her playful, body-centric cartoon characters that transform feminine ideals and the anxieties they induce into drawings of anthropomorphized private parts. . . .When a clitoris is crowned queen, her demeanor changes in various ways. For one, she starts to wear a crown ― obviously. She also becomes more steadfast in her desires, knowing just what turns her on and how to get it. She’s emboldened to speak her mind, in whatever language clits speak in these days, and not afraid to bring the sass when necessary . . . “It was triggered by all the bad sex I’ve had in my life,” said Engstrom. “But instead of making some sad cartoons, I wanted them to be funny.”

See more of the cartoons at The Huffington Post.

 

 

2.

Are Corporate Expense Policies Biased Against Women?

untitledSource: fastcompany.com

In an article for Fast Company, Laura Vanderkam details how some companies are starting to question their reimbursement policies for working mothers. One of the key areas looked it is the lack of consideration for childcare expenses when women, as opposed to men, have to work late or extra hours.

[A]s companies take the broader view of how to keep women moving up the ranks, some are addressing this same dilemma . . . According to Krista Carothers, senior research editor at the Working Mother Research Institute, of the organizations on the 2015 Working Mother 100 Best Companies list, 35% offer business travel childcare reimbursement, and 23% offer overtime childcare reimbursement.

Ultimately, says Vanderkam, the take-away is that “expense policies are yet another way that the business world keeps women from reaching the top.”

Read more at Fast Company.

 

 

3.

Films at the Toronto Film Festival Address Shifting Conversations on Rape and Sexual Assault

As the Toronto Film Festival continues this week, Vox reports that two films, Elle and Una, attempting to address how women deal with rape fall short, in part because they’re both made by men. Todd VanDerWeff writes:

Neither film is from the US, and neither film has anything to do with, say, our current discussion of campus sexual assault. But both are accidentally timely all the same, zeroing in on how ideas of “consent” can seem hazy in practice, and how little we understand our own emotions when it comes to games of sex and power. . . Both films have their problems, which are at some level traceable to another shared trait: They’re both written and directed by men, and based on works written by men, despite having female protagonists.

Read VanDerWeff’s full analysis of these films at Vox.

Read More »

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