Tag Archives : essay

Family & Friends · General Medical

A Special Assignment

By Julie M. Danis
Special work assignments usually offer special experiences. Like the time I cooked and test-marketed new hamburger sandwiches — mushroom Swiss and pizza barbecue — as part of a promotion for a fast-food chain, or when I ran catering triage behind the scenes of a professional golf tournament. These out-of-the-office jobs opened my eyes to real assembly-line production and the unglamorous…
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Family & Friends · Lifestyle

Thankful for My Aunts

By Elizabeth Willse
My mom is one of six sisters. Every Thanksgiving, my mother’s family gathers at Aunt Ruthanne and Uncle Ron’s house in Connecticut. The table stretches from the dining room into the living room, with a joyous crowd of parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents and friends. “We don’t say grace,” my late Uncle Howie once quipped. “We do The Wave.” I…
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Family & Friends · Lifestyle

The Compass Rose: Thicker Than Water

By Ainslie Jones Uhl
“Let’s have a family Thanksgiving,” I said to my friend Mary, “without any blood relatives.” It was a time a few years ago when I had had my fill of filial histrionics and was fed up with the my-way-or-the-highway holiday hosts. I wanted a tradition without the traditional baggage, a happy feast prepared and shared by all — and lots…
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General Medical

Making It to 92

By Julie M. Danis
All the doctors sang the same tune, “You’re getting older.” Generally, I didn’t think I looked or felt like I was approaching 50, whatever that is suppose to look and feel like. But it’s difficult to feel young when the diagnosis is “old.” I did feel sweaty at night, hot during the day and generally irritable all the time, which…
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Food & Drink · Lifestyle

Memories of Friendship and Blueberry Pie

By Patricia Yarberry Allen, M.D.
My friend Adam Dolle wrote me last week to let me know that his mother, Viola Dolle, had died after only a brief illness. Mrs. Dolle was a devout Catholic who traveled to Rome when she was 90 for an outdoor Christmas Eve Mass celebrated by Pope John Paul II. She lived a long life with attention and affection given…
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Film & Television · News

Roman Polanski, It’s Not the 1970′s Anymore. Thank God.

By Chris Lombardi
This week’s arrest of Roman Polanski felt weirdly unsurprising. It fit somehow with all the flashbacks to 1969 the media’s treated us to this year — as that TIME cover put it, “From the Moon to Charles Manson.” What will the 1970s reminiscences be like, one wondered? Maybe like this. But who really remembers 1977? And what does anyone really…
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Family & Friends · Lifestyle

The Dirty Dozen

By Susan B. Johnson
A few years back, Oprah Winfrey announced she would be devoting an entire hour to the importance of “girlfriends” in women’s lives. As I groped for the remote control to turn off the TV, the camera panned an audience of smiling faces—as young as 25, as old as 70—and I found myself reaching for the tissue box instead. Here were…
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Lifestyle

For Yom Kippur, Another Reinvention

By Shelley Singer
The baby rabbi, a young man of 26 — fresh from seminary, the most junior of the four in our vast congregation — delivered the sermon on Rosh Hashanah morning. At first, he spoke of creation and destruction, judgment and mercy as the messages of the festival. This day, he said, we are created anew through an act of God’s…
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Emotional Health

Friends Rescue Friends

By Laura Baudo Sillerman
We are five unlikely friends who have been together for 18 years. We’ve seen one another through three divorces, three marriages, the deaths of four parents, the near-death of one spouse, and the birth of four children and a grandchild. There have also been four big moves, to the point where only one of us now lives where all of…
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Lifestyle · News

Patricia Yarberry Allen: Memories of That Morning

By Patricia Yarberry Allen, M.D.
September 11, 2001 I had just finished my first case of the day in the gynecology operating suite at New York Presbyterian Hospital. My patient had been transferred to the recovery room nurse, and I sat by her bed to write my notes. Then I was paged to the phone. It was Mommie, from her home in Columbia, Ky. She…
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News

Project Resilience: Panzi Hospital’s Life During Wartime

By Ladner Lim Kristin
About two years ago a friend of mine in California told me about a  story on National Public Radio about the war in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Called “Africa’s World War” because of the estimated five million people killed there since 1996, it’s been called by human rights experts  the deadliest conflict since World War II. To…
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Fine Art · Lifestyle

The Ant and the Caterpillar: A Summer Photo Essay

By Shelley Singer
I have a moment to share: not a senior moment, to which so many of us are prone, but more like a driveway moment — a term used on National Public Radio to describe a story so compelling it keeps you in your car long after you’ve reached your destination. In this case, though, the radio was off. My husband…
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Lifestyle

The Red Wheelbarrow: A Meditation

By Billie Brown
so much depends
 upon a red wheel
barrow glazed with rain
water beside the white
chickens. So wrote the young aspiring poet William Carlos Williams in 1923. At his young age, how did he know? At his age, I was aspiring to be the world’s greatest poet or film star – or a cheerleader. Later, as a wife and mother I strove for…
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Family & Friends · Lifestyle

When Mother’s Day Brings Only Questions

By Diane Vacca
I didn’t like my mother. I don’t remember ever feeling close to her, and I was always convinced that she had no idea who I really was, what I believed, what I wanted or why. I remember coming home with torn pants and knees bloodied from climbing trees or rolling down grassy slopes, confounding her belief that little girls should…
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