Tag Archives : Cecilia Ford

Emotional Health

On the Bright Side: Three Kinds of Advice You Can Safely Ignore

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.

One of the most popular buzz words is “mindful.” This word is almost everywhere these days, so much so that it is becoming meaningless. I almost lost my own mind when I saw a sign in a clothing store the other day claiming they were “mindful” of the origin of the seeds of the plants their fabrics came from.

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Film & Television

The ‘Real’ Women of Independent Films

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.

The lives dramatized in these films aren’t always easy to look at but we will all recognize parts of ourselves in them and be glad that these talented actresses and filmmakers have the courage to look honestly at these women. Quirky, ambiguous, contradictory, idiosyncratic, independent films are like real women themselves, always surprising, and in a class by themselves.

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Emotional Health · Sex & Sexuality

Dr. Ford on Emotional Health: Young Women, Dating Apps, and Sexual Hyperactivity

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.

While casual sex became acceptable to many young people, it wasn’t until the advent of the Internet that people didn’t have to actually meet each other to have sex. A recent article in 'Vanity Fair' describes the “hook-up culture,” which is facilitated by apps like Tinder and Hinge, as the “dating apocalypse.”

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Ask Dr. Pat

Dr. Pat Consults: Dementia—Symptoms, Risk Factors, and Diagnosis

By Megan Riddle, M.D. Ph.D. MS
By Megan Riddle, M.D. Ph.D.

There are a number of risk factors for developing dementia. These can be thought of broadly in two categories: those that you can do something about and those that you cannot. Risk factors you can’t change include aging—risk dramatically rises with age, with more than 50 percent of those older than 85 being affected—and genetics.

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Emotional Health

A Psychologist’s Thoughts on Change

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.

People who walk into a therapist’s office are brave. Not because there’s a stigma attached to it (at least not in New York, where I practice) but because they are willing to reveal themselves to a stranger. They are not complaining. They are willing to say, “I want to look at things I have hidden even from myself.”

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