Search results for :weddings

Lifestyle

Rightsizing Your Friends and Lovers

By Ro Howe
Rightsizing relationships is about the choices you make — not others’ choices — through attrition, pain, and, yes, death. Circumstances change, prompting decisions that have probably already been made subconsciously
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Emotional Health · Marriage & Life Partners · News

Let LGBT Be the Issue to Unify Us

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.

Perhaps a dialectic is occurring that will eventually lead to truly widespread acceptance of LGBT individuals. This issue could be an important step on the road to easing tensions between groups, maybe even a cornerstone. Why? It is now recognized that sexual/gender orientation is an issue that any family can encounter and knows no racial, ethnic or political divisions.

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News

The Wednesday Five

By Women's Voices For Change
In this week's Wednesday Five: women are writing the best crime novels now more than ever; Charna Helpern is the hidden architect of modern comedy; an inspiring story of how one family's heirloom wedding dress has been worn by 11 brides over 120 years; the Women's Prison Association is turning the women of 'Orange Is the New Black' into prison activists; and Mary Norris is 'The New Yorker's' comma queen.
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Emotional Health · Family & Friends

Christmas Given and Received

By Ro Howe
By Ro Howe

Gifts to give to a young parent of limited means: A series of classes on how to plan, shop, cook and serve healthy meals for their family and a copy of “The Joy of Cooking.” Because: Give a person a gift card to McDonalds and you feed them for a day; teach a person how to cook and you feed them — and their family, for a generation.

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Marriage & Life Partners · News

Cantor Debbi: Have Torah, Will Travel

By Roz Warren
By Roz Warren

Where a more traditional cantor might turn down the opportunity to officiate at an interfaith or LGBT wedding, Debbi Ballard’s approach is to focus on the possible. “I‘d rather say ‘yes’ than ‘no’,” she explains. “’No’ ends the conversation. ‘Yes’ begins a dialogue. With ‘yes,’ you leave the door open.”

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