Marriage & Life Partners · Relationships & Dating

Is This Love?

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
The science of romance isn’t “romantic,” but focuses instead on practical issues. Research confirms that believing in soul mates—or destiny, “the idea that there is exactly one person you were absolutely put on this earth to find—can and probably will backfire.”
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Film & Television

Step—Lethal Ladies, Lofty Goals

By Alexandra MacAaron
As the “Black Lives Matter” movement gains momentum around them, spurred on by incidents in Sanford, Ferguson, New York, and Waller County, as well as Baltimore, you can understand why step feels so relevant and personal to the girls. There is a fierce defiance to their routines. These young women are determined.
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Health

August Sun Protection and Skin Care

By Anetta Reszko, M.D., Ph.D.
Now that we’re in August, our sun protection enthusiasm might be declining. Nonetheless, considering that over 70 percent of UV radiation exposure occurs in the summer months, sun protection is as important as ever. Here are important tips on skin care.
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Poetry

Poetry Sunday: “Migrant Earth,” by Deema Shehabi

By Rebecca Foust
Left explicitly unsaid but everywhere in the poem is the speaker’s terrible grief for her loss and also perhaps a roil of sorrow, regret, and even anger about what her mother had to endure during her life. That these emotions are hinted at but not stated is part of the power of “Migrant Earth.”
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Lifestyle

Molly Fisk: Naming Your Teeth

By Molly Fisk
A three-year-old I know just explained to his mom that he needed an umbrella because it was hot in the yard and “there isn't a shade structure.” Coffee almost flew out my nose when she told me this, I was laughing so hard.
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Books · Emotional Health

Man’s Search for Meaning

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
The most helpful insight of Viktor Frankl, psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor: “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”
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Lifestyle

Molly Fisk: Renting A Wife

By Molly Fisk
Long, long ago, I think it was the 1980s, a business appeared on the radar called Rent-a-Wife. For a reasonable sum per hour, they'd pick up your dry cleaning, wait for the plumber, return videos and library books, maybe do a little grocery shopping.
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Money & Careers

Career Networking for the Introverted

By Phyllis Cohen
Networking can be a struggle whether you’re a shrinking violet or the life of the party. But before you make that first networking step, it’s crucial to know the two most important rules about why people do or do not get hired in the first place.
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Health

Molly Fisk: Fair Weather

By Molly Fisk
I see people from all parts of my life at the fair: Cardiac Rehab buddies, grocery store bag-persons, kids I taught poetry to in the sixth grade. The fair sort of has its own rules: it's half Breughel painting, half time-travel science-fiction movie.
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Poetry

Poetry Sunday: “Sieve,” by April Ossmann

By Rebecca Foust
“Sieve” begins, as all good poems should, with an attention-grabbing first line, “Young men seem all edges,” and then ups the interest ante with two delightful and apt similes, “shoulders like shelves” and my favorite, “bellies like slides / to the most obvious / of pleasures.” That’s a sly, possibly punning allusion to sex, of course, and one I haven’t seen before but that feels just right.
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Lifestyle

Molly Fisk: Ferris Wheel

By Molly Fisk
When I was 14, I developed a short list of requirements for being a good girlfriend. Heaven knows where I got this idea, maybe from reading 'Seventeen Magazine.' You had to be able to gut a fish and cook it. You had to be brave enough to go skydiving (but only once per boyfriend).
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Poetry

Poetry Sunday: “The Way Back,” by Francine Sterle

By Susan Cohen
Francine Sterle’s “The Way Back” enchanted me from the first time I read it. First, her lush lyricism. Then, the poem’s payoff, an ending that is emotional without being the least bit sentimental. What draws me back again and again, though, is the way she controls breath on the page.
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