Why Stand By?: The Chicago Tribune looks at why political wives stand alongside their spouses acknowledging sexual indiscretion. “Even if they want to kill him, they’re there,” says Kathleen Gilbert, an associate professor of family studies at Indiana University.

Ladies Take the Lead: “Chicks are back, accessible is back, fun is back at HBO,” writes Washington Post TV critic Lisa de Moreas.

HBO announced it had ordered up 13 episodes of “The No. 1 Ladies’
Detective Agency,” based on the international best-selling novels of Alexander McCall Smith and starring Jill Scott as Precious Ramotswe. The network has also greenlighted a pilot from “Will & Grace” alum Jhoni Marchinko, called “Driving Around With Joni,” “about a successful 40-year-old woman, suddenly widowed, who spends her days driving around Los Angeles with her French bulldog trying to figure out the meaning of life,” among other more female-friendly shows.

Plus: AARP launches AARP TV. Here’s more.

Writers Put Girls into History: Two sisters have received funding from the Kentucky Foundation for Women to publish the first book in their “Kentucky Girl” series, featuring young heroines in historically accurate settings. Rebecca Mitchell Turney tells the Cincinnati Enquirer readers will experience Shaker Village through the eyes of 10-year-old Betsy.

“She is educated better than girls anywhere else in the state, and given opportunities to follow her own God-given talents — all with the support of a communal Shaker sisterhood,” Turney said. “Not such a bad life, huh? I dare say many of us are still looking for such a utopia for our daughters today.”

A Dose of Desire?: The search for a women’s version of Viagra continues, with the most optimistic researchers believing that a “pink Viagra” is five years away or less. But as the Washington Post reports, not everyone is cheering.

“Drug companies want to say to women, ‘You don’t need to know anything; you can have the satisfying sex life that you seek — people dancing on TV, the whole bit — without knowing anything. Just ask your doctor,'” says Leonore Tiefer, a psychotherapist and clinical associate professor at New York University, who has long decried what she calls “the medicalization of women’s sexuality.”

“I resent that, because there are specific harms that come from being ignorant and dependent in the world we live in,” adds Tiefer. “There may be lots of people who aren’t interested in sex, but is there a medical reason for that, and do we diagnose that?”

The Post’s David Segal adds:

Tiefer’s critique centers, in part, on the way that pink Viagra is sure to be marketed — with ads day and night, suggesting that women who aren’t feeling frisky have a medical problem. She and her allies — organized as the New View Campaign — are also galled that so much money and media attention are heaped on the lust drug, even before it exists, when for many women the solution to their libido problems isn’t that exotic. Maybe they have a partner who hasn’t a clue about technique. Maybe they’re stressed out. Maybe they can’t possibly get in the mood because they’re so busy raising children. Therapy, counseling, even free day care, says the New View Campaign, might do more for women’s sex lives than any drug company ever could.

Christine

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