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Poetry

Poetry Sunday: “The Path,” by Anna Yin

By Rebecca Foust
A poem can be powerful and remain elusive and mysterious at the same time. In fact, many would argue that less accessible poems are more powerful than transparent ones. In this case, “The Path” is a mysterious poem, but one that also tells a clear story.
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Poetry

Poetry Sunday: “The Role of Elegy,” by Mary Jo Bang

By Rebecca Foust
As with most successful poems about personal grief, this one dwells less on the particulars of this speaker’s loss than on something more universal: the nature of suffering and the utter inability of our carefully compiled rituals to dispel it. And also of the inevitable human impulse still to try.
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Film & Television

Vintage TV Review: Small Screens, Glass Ceilings

By Alexandra MacAaron
Fifty years ago, television viewers were getting glimpses into the lives of a strange new breed: career girls. Often played for laughs, but also presented with compassion and sympathy, these determined characters broke through the small screen — if not the glass ceiling — on a weekly basis.
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Film & Television

Step—Lethal Ladies, Lofty Goals

By Alexandra MacAaron
As the “Black Lives Matter” movement gains momentum around them, spurred on by incidents in Sanford, Ferguson, New York, and Waller County, as well as Baltimore, you can understand why step feels so relevant and personal to the girls. There is a fierce defiance to their routines. These young women are determined.
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Poetry

Poetry Sunday: “Migrant Earth,” by Deema Shehabi

By Rebecca Foust
Left explicitly unsaid but everywhere in the poem is the speaker’s terrible grief for her loss and also perhaps a roil of sorrow, regret, and even anger about what her mother had to endure during her life. That these emotions are hinted at but not stated is part of the power of “Migrant Earth.”
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Books · Emotional Health

Man’s Search for Meaning

By Cecilia M. Ford, Ph.D.
The most helpful insight of Viktor Frankl, psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor: “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”
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