Rebecca Foust was the 2017-18 Poet Laureate of Marin County. Her fifth book, “Paradise Drive,” won the 2015 Press 53 Award for Poetry and was reviewed in the Georgia Review, Hudson Review, Huffington Post, Philadelphia Inquirer, San Francisco Chronicle, Washington Review of Books, and elsewhere. Recognitions include the 2015 American Literary Review Award for Fiction, the 2015 James Hearst Poetry Prize, the 2014 Constance Rook Creative Nonfiction Award, and fellowships from the Frost Place, MacDowell Colony, Sewanee Writer’s Conference, and West Chester Poetry Conference. “Paradise Drive” can be ordered at www.press53.com. For more information visit rebeccafoust.com.
Poetry

“Life Line” by Ann Townsend

By Rebecca Foust
In these divided times I am grateful for poems like this to remind us of good things we may have taken for granted before—like just “getting” to sit in an uncomfortable folding chair in a school auditorium—and of the experiences many of us have in common.
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Poetry

“To Be Held” by Linda Hogan

By Rebecca Foust
“To Be Held” falls within the pastoral tradition of a poet wandering in nature and finding inspiration there. In it, the speaker encounters a tree in her desert landscape that then becomes a springboard for a larger reflection about humanity.
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Poetry

“Yes,” by Denise Duhamel

By Rebecca Foust
Reading “Yes,” we get a real sense of commitment to making a marriage work and, maybe more importantly, of the sense that this is not just a tedious chore. Real affection, and humor, lighten the touch here.
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Poetry

Review: Ledger by Jane Hirshfield

By Rebecca Foust
Ledger’s poems take stock of the losses—both personal to this speaker and in the larger sense of our world’s ever-diminishing resources and species—and do so with a mounting sense of crisis.
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Poetry

“Small Kindnesses,” by Danusha Laméris

By Rebecca Foust
Maybe the best way we can all help now is to stay calm and focused on the goal of emerging from seclusion into a healthier climate in a few weeks or months. And, when we do go out or otherwise interact with others, to be kind and to treat everyone with an extra level of compassion and respect. That’s why “Small Kindnesses” is an important poem to feature this week.
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Poetry

Rachel Hadas: “Love and Dread”

By Rebecca Foust
Today’s poem does not call for an eradication of dread, though it does lament its existence. Dread plays a necessary role in human life, and the poem seems to acknowledge it as the yin to love’s yang, the dark to the light side of the moon, despair’s counterpart to hope.
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