Diane Vacca is trained as a medievalist and taught medieval literature, Spanish and Italian at several universities before becoming a journalist with specialties in politics, the arts and New York City. Her work can also be found at Vacca Bureau of Investigation,Comedy Beat and the New York City biweekly Chelsea Now, where she covers everything from education and public housing to landmark designation and the arts.
Arts & Culture · Books · News · Politics

Book Review: Sonia Sotomayor—Too Flamboyant for the Supreme Court?

By Diane Vacca
By Diane Vacca

Because of her ethnicity, Sonia Sotomayor was automatically stigmatized. In addition, her innate extroversion was amplified by the exuberance of Latin culture, and this too was held against her, even when she became a Supreme Court justice. Her propensities for fire-engine-red nail polish, unruly hair, and “flashy” jewelry were singled out by the news media as markers of her otherness.

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Health

Banahan and Kentucky: Obamacare Done Right

By Diane Vacca
By Diane Vacca

“When I applied [for Kentucky Obamacare], that was the best eight minutes of my life,” LaTonya Ellington told me. “It only took eight minutes to sign up, and it changed my life.” She photographed her application and displays it on her cell phone.

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Politics

Let’s Make a Deal: Women Senators Get Things Done

By Diane Vacca
By Diane Vacca

Female senators have persuaded their male colleagues that “women’s issues” affect everybody; that sexual assault in the military is a real problem, and not just for women; that health, education, child care, abortion, and pay equity affect the entire family. And they seized the reins in the default debate.

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Family & Friends

Today’s Sons Are Teaching Their Fathers

By Diane Vacca
By Diane Vacca

When I was growing up, it was unusual to see a father kiss or embrace his son in public, especially if the boy was an adolescent or older. Tom Ruth was “very young, probably less than 12,” when his father would kiss him. “After that, it was the occasional hug. Not a lot of display of emotion,” he said. “Men don’t cry, that sort of thing.”

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Film & Television · News · Politics

The Provocations of Hannah Arendt

By Diane Vacca
By Diane Vacca

When Adolf Eichmann, a former officer in the SS, was captured in Argentina and taken to Jerusalem, "The New Yorker" tapped Arendt to cover his trial, one of the most sensational of the century. Arendt was a German Jew who had experienced firsthand the pain of exile and was compelled to flee the Nazi regime, first in Germany and later in France. No one anticipated that her reportage would result in a third exile—ostracism by most of the Jewish community.

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Fashion & Beauty

Birthday Tsunami

By Diane Vacca
Was The Birthday responsible for these mishaps—these signs of falling apart—coming in such rapid succession? I had survived 35, weathered 50, and pretty much sailed through 60. But 70?
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