Film & Television

“And the Oscar Goes to . . .This Year’s Oscars”

Throughout the evening, montages of past category winners and classic film clips were an entertaining reminder of why we love movies. It was a brilliant move, highlighting all that’s good about an industry that has been rightfully called to task for abhorrent and seemingly systemic behavior. In a similar move, some of Hollywood’s grandest dames were on hand, including Rita Morena (stunning in the very dress she wore when she won her Oscar in 1962 — go ahead, do the math), and Eva Marie Saint who honored her late husband and the masters (and mistresses) she worked with 60 years ago. She gently reminded the audience that she’s older than Oscar.

Of course, in between the moving speeches, clever comedy and rousing musical numbers, there were the awards themselves. Virtually every major winner was the odds-on favorite (although in most cases, the runners up were equally worthy). Best Supporting Actor went to Sam Rockwell for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri; Supporting Actress to the spectacular Allison Janney for I, Tonya; Best Director to Guillermo Del Toro for The Shape of Water; and Best Actor to Gary Oldham for The Darkest Hour.

Best Actress winner Frances McDormand was her usual larger than life — and anything but conventional — self as she took the stage for Best Actress in Three Billboards. She brought the crowd to its feet, quite literally, as she urged every woman nominated in any category to stand. “Look around, ladies and gentlemen,” she practically crowed, “Because we all have stories to tell and projects we need financed. Don’t talk to us about it at the parties tonight. Invite us into your office in a couple days, or you can come to ours—whichever suits you best—and we’ll tell you all about them.” She finished her speech, “I have two words to leave you with tonight, ladies and gentlemen: inclusion rider.”

Those with smart phones handy soon learned that an inclusion rider is an equity clause for contracts that insures diversity on film sets. (Hallelujah! And it’s about time.)

The Academy graciously gave veteran presenters Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty a “do over.” With the correct envelope in hand this time, and good humor all around, they announced the final and most prestigious award for Best Picture. It was Del Toro’s Shape of Water, which one can only assume beat Three Billboards by a nose.

Then again, as Kimmell noted at the beginning of the broadcast, “We will always remember this year as the year men screwed up so badly, women started dating fish.” So perhaps the win was inevitable.

Technically, the Oscars can’t win an Oscar. But, maybe they can get an Emmy. This year, Hollywood’s salute to its own achievements made for excellent television indeed. May the progress continue.

Join the conversation

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  • Cheryl March 6, 2018 at 9:35 am

    I have always liked to watch the Oscars, for what it was was designed to be: entertainment, beautiful gowns… and most importantly- the best in acting. What it is has turned out to be is: political theatre, hence the lowest drop in viewing apparently since 1976 news sources report. If acting, sports, and the like would stay with what they do best, and leave their politics at the door, more viewers would enjoy it again…

    Reply
  • Cheryl March 6, 2018 at 9:34 am

    I have always liked to watch the Oscars, for what it was was designed to be: entertainment, beautiful gowns… and most importantly- the best in acting. What it is has turned out to be is: political theatre, hence the lowest drop in viewing apparently since 1976 news sources report. If acting, sports, and the like would stay with what they do best, and leave their politics at the door, more viewers would enjoy it again…

    Reply
    • Pam Woodson March 6, 2018 at 10:00 am

      The Oscars are a different movie every year, view it as a movie you wouldn’t recommend, for many of us it’s the movie we’ve been waiting to see!

      Reply