Last year, we were thrilled to inaugurate our annual celebration of WVFC writers, which compiled all the books and authors we’d covered into an easy-to-use holiday shopping list— one for poetry and one for prose. This year, we’re doing the same. Some of the authors, like Gail Sheehy and Dominique Browning, we’ve gotten to know well in interviews and commentaries; others’ books have inspired reviews here for multiple reasons. Some are light ovelsn, some sober histories, some feminist manifestos. And this time, in honor of WVFC’s 5th anniversary, we’re also throwing in a few blasts from the past — new books by authors we featured from 2006-2008. The total would have made for lists far too long to post here, but we hope you explore our Books archives to find more writers we’ve reviewed, interviewed, and whose awards we’ve celebrated over the past five years.


Pat Benatar, Between a Heart and a Rock Place


Lloyd Boston, The Style Checklist
Dominique Browning’s Slow Love is actually dedicated to WVFC’s Dr. Pat Allen. The year we launched, Dr. Allen also tipped us off to Amy Bloom’s talent, long before Bloom’s new novel Where the God of Love Hangs Out.

Gail Caldwell, Let’s Take the Long Way Home

Judy Collins, Over the Rainbow

Roz Chast‘s newest book is the children’s collection Too Busy Marco.


Edwidge Danticat opened our 2010 with news from Haiti; her new book is Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work.
Fannie Flagg, I Still Dream About You

John Fowles. The Tree

Jaimy Gordon, Lord of Misrule
Nicole Hollander, The Sylvia Chronicles


Virginia Ironside, You’re Old, I’m Old . . . Get Used to It!: Twenty Reasons Why Growing Old Is Great In 2007, we applauded Ironside’s No! I Don’t Want to Join a Book Club: Diary of a Sixtieth Year. In the new book–Ironside’s first published in the U.S.–the author “is determined to convince people that getting old is not so bad–even for a Baby Boomer who interviewed the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix early in her career.

Judith Jones, The Pleasure of Cooking for One



Maira Kalman, And the Pursuit of Happiness
Mary Karr, Lit.
We reviewed Laura Lippman’s Life Sentences; her new book, I’d Know You Anywhere, also works the terrain Lippman has been exploring in her Memory Project.


Tara Parker-Pope, For Better: The Science of a Good Marriage
Jennifer Pozner, Reality Bites Back: The Cruel Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV



Judy Richardson and Dorothy Zellner, Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC
Judy Shepard, The Meaning of Matthew: My Son’s Murder in Laramie, and a World Transformed

Cathleen Schine, The Three Weissmans of Westport








Gail Sheehy, Passages in Caregiving








Rebecca Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Rebecca Traister, Big Girls Don’t Cry: The Election That Changed Everything for American Women

Mary Walton, A Woman’s Crusade: Alice Paul and the Battle for the Ballot
Lis Wiehl and April Henry, Hand of Fate: A Triple Threat Novel. In 2007, we cheered attorney Wiehl’s manifesto The 51% Minority: How Women Still Are Not Equal and What You Can Do About It, Since then, Wiehl has teamed up with coauthor Henry for the best-selling Triple Threat series of legal thrillers. Publishers Weekly wrote of this latest installment in the series, out just in time for holiday sales: “Readers will identify with these very real women.”

Let us know what books you think we should add to our lists. And check back on Friday for the Poetry Edition, to scoop up all our Voices in Verse.