Here at WVFC, we’ve always maintained that there are myriad ways to use one’s voice. The National Osteoporosis Foundation’s new initiative, “Generations of Strength: Mothers and Daughters” is a worthy example of how the simple act of conversation can be a powerful way to impart vital health information. On September 26th, NOF introduced the campaign at a well-attended luncheon at the elegant Pierre Hotel in Manhattan. The event kicked off with champagne and a silent auction featuring splurge-worthy goods ranging from Judith Ripka earrings to a week in Antiqua. Afterwards, attendees dined on filet mignon while two lithe and lovely members of Dance Times Square strutted, swayed, and swirled their stuff. They were young, but we have to say that watching how beautifully they moved was inspiration for keeping our own bodies strong and supple.

The goal of the Generations of Strength campaign is to encourage mothers to pass along to their daughters the information they will need to do just that. According to NOF, one in two women is at risk of an osteoporotic fracture, and one in four will actually suffer from one. By talking to their daughters about bone health, calcium, vitamin D, exercise, and other important factors related to osteoporosis, NOF maintains that mothers can help to prevent osteoporosis for generations to come.

Of course, talking the talk is most effective when one also walks the walk — or, as NOF’s Generation Award recipient Lisa Oz (wife of TV’s Dr. Oz) said, “You have to take care of yourself in order to take care of your loved ones.” We get that: If, say, you’re extolling the benefits of exercise to your daughter when you haven’t seen the inside of a gym in years, your words are likely to fall on deaf ears. But if you deliver your message from the pulpit of an exercise bike, then odds are she’ll take it to heart. Stated honorary chairperson Gail Sheehy (who will be writing regularly about osteoporosis for WVFC, starting today), “It’s important to have conversations before a health crises.”