Days of Their Lives: Sandy Wilbur, Forensic Musicologist

October 6, 2015 by Deborah Harkins

Sandy Wilbur

By Deborah Harkins

What IS musical plagiarism? Is a particular number of notes, strung in a certain order, the giveaway? Sandy Wilbur, forensic musicologist, says no; it’s more complicated than that.

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Days of Their Lives—Earth, Fire, Water: Jerolyn Morrison’s Dream Job

October 5, 2015 by Deborah Harkins


By Deborah Harkins

Jerolyn and her fellow researchers tease out the details of the ancient Minoans’ domestic life through piecing together shattered objects, chemical analysis, experiments (like cooking demonstrations), and informed speculation. “We put these deposits together very slowly, very meticulously, to form a story about an archaeological deposit that’s been excavated,” she tells us.

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Cantor Debbi: Have Torah, Will Travel

October 4, 2015 by Roz Warren

Debbi Baillard

By Roz Warren

Where a more traditional cantor might turn down the opportunity to officiate at an interfaith or LGBT wedding, Debbi Ballard’s approach is to focus on the possible. “I‘d rather say ‘yes’ than ‘no’,” she explains. “’No’ ends the conversation. ‘Yes’ begins a dialogue. With ‘yes,’ you leave the door open.”

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A Woman Who’s Made a Difference: Mary Palmer, Seattle’s Pied Piper

October 2, 2015 by Toni Myers


By Toni Myers

The Global Reading Challenge is designed to include all fourth/fifth graders, not just the avid readers, though they are its biggest cheerleaders. Though it means more work, they love the excitement (as well as the safety) of competing in teams; the wild and crazy practice sessions; the recognition by everyone in school; the realization later that they will always and forever be Global Scholars.

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Dominique Browning: ‘Making a Difference in the Air We Breathe’

October 1, 2015 by Judith A. Ross


By Judith A. Ross

While what we do at home is important, “it’s not what is going to solve this [climate change] problem,” Dominique Browning says. “What will work is old-fashioned citizenship.”

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Risky Business: Reinventing Life in Middle Age—or Later

September 30, 2015 by Deborah Harkins

By Deborah Harkins

“Law school almost killed me. It almost kills even the 22-year-olds,” says Diane Bradshaw. A singer-dancer-actress for a quarter of a century, she finally yielded, when she was 48, to the continuing call of a college education. “Law school tore up my guts,” she says. “But I’m glad it did, because practicing law tears up your guts too, and a lawyer has to be able to withstand that.” And then there was the financial risk . . .

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‘Left Behind,’ by Kim Akhtar

September 29, 2015 by Kim Akhtar


Anwar was driving fast and the car’s red taillights soon disappeared when they reached the end of the lane and turned right back onto the main highway. It happened so fast. All of a sudden Zahra was gone. She’d left me there. But why? I couldn’t understand. What had I done that was so wrong?

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A Woman Who’s Made a Difference: Clara Bingham, Investigative Journalist

September 29, 2015 by Deborah Harkins

Clara Bingham (photo, Porter Gifford).

By Deborah Harkins

“These are David and Goliath stories,” Clara Bingham acknowledges. “I like to write about whistle-blowers and people who put their lives on the line to fight corruption.”

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The Vulnerable Female Body: “Putting Back the Damaged Parts”

September 28, 2015 by Deborah Harkins

Dr. Lauri Romanzi, in burka, on a U.N. medical mission in Afghanistan . . .

By Deborah Harkins

Dr. Lauri Romanzi operates on women in developing countries who have suffered pelvic-organ injuries—many of them through obstructed childbirth. Some of her patients “have suffered so greatly at the hands of their communities,” she notes, “that even if they’re returned to fully normal function, they often don’t want to go back to their village.”

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Sojourner Truth: Let Us Now Praise Extraordinary Women

September 27, 2015 by Deborah Harkins

Portrait of Sojourner Truth in 1850.

By Deborah Harkins

“Sojourner Truth was an architect of democracy as we know it! She was the first black woman feminist ever!” the opera director mused. “I started to get grumpy—Who has tucked this woman under the coffee table, and why have they done it?”

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Thanksgiving in Tanzania: The Story of an Accidental Priest

September 26, 2015 by Deborah Harkins


By Deborah Harkins

Rev. Dr. Sandra McCann has switched careers abruptly—and with some amazement—all through her life. Ask her how she happened to become a doctor, then a radiologist, then a priest, and she’ll say, with a touch of wonder, “I was taken by surprise!”

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Women of Reinvention: Paige Morrow Kimball

September 25, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

We’ve decided to pay tribute to these women in our Women of Reinvention Series, acknowledging that for each of them (and you), the concept of reinvention takes on very different and nuanced meanings, and is often redefined at various points in our lives. For some women, reinventing themselves is about survival; for others, it’s about new beginnings; and for others, like Paige Morrow Kimball, it’s simply about adding to who you already are.

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Rebellious Women: Heroines of the Labor Movement

September 7, 2015 by Janet Golden


By Janet Golden

“That’s the rebel girl/For the working class she’s a precious pearl”: So goes Joe Hill’s song celebrating one of the eight firebrands we’re honoring here—women who fought tirelessly (and effectively) for workers’ rights. Alas, these days hardly anybody knows their names.

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She Remembers His Helping Hand: Frank Gifford Gave Her a Chance, and She Made a Life

August 10, 2015 by Melissa Ludtke

Monday Night Football commentator Frank Gifford is shown posing for the camera while sitting in the end zone of a football field

By Melissa Ludtke

A friend of mine died yesterday. He was 84 years old. We hadn’t seen each other in at least three decades, maybe longer. But that’s beside the point: I will always think of Frank Gifford as my friend. Here’s why: Frank saw potential in me when I didn’t see much in myself and he reached out a hand to help me discover it.

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At 40, Christie Rampone is Oldest Women’s Soccer Player in a World Cup Final

July 6, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change


Last month, at age 39, Christie Rampone became the oldest player to appear in a World Cup game, when the United States defeated Nigeria, 1-0. She had her 40th birthday on June 24 and became the oldest women’s soccer player to ever appear in a World Cup final.

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