The Wednesday Five

September 2, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Elena Ferrante on the conclusion of her Neapolitan novels, the ‘It’s On Us’ campaign aims to stop campus sexual assault, a two-week experiment in giving up refined sugar yields positive results, Steffi Graf as women’s tennis unconquerable force, and a splendid list of fall 2015 movies for grown-ups.

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The Wednesday Five

August 26, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Women’s voices, great ones, are dominating podcasts, Chicago wins as the city with the most start-ups founded by women, the late photographer Mary Ellen Mark pays tribute to New Orleans in her final assignment, a new documentary charts the groundbreaking career of tennis superstar Althea Gibson, and this week’s New York Times Magazine has the award-winning poet Claudia Rankine weaving words about the athlete Serena Williams.

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When Women’s Bodies Get Censored on Facebook: An Artist Responds

August 26, 2015 by Grace Graupe-Pillard

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By Grace Graupe-Pillard

In my portraits, the personal and the political are interlaced: they involve risk through a literal baring of self, expose the vulnerabilities of aging, and explore with humor and pathos, how I as an older woman exist and navigate as unnoticeable in an urban environment.

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The Wednesday Five

August 19, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Melissa McCarthy’s new fashion line says no to ‘plus-size’ labels, Sarah Manguso of Harper’s magazine curates a list of writers’ advice on how to be a parent, a beautifully imagined conversation between artist Frida Kahlo and poet Sylvia Plath, speaking of Frida Kahlo, we are reminded of Eleanor Foa Dienstag’s review of “Frida Kahlo: Art. Garden. Life” on view at The New York Botanical Garden through November, and an essay by Sarah M. Broom unravels the ripples of Hurricane Katrina.

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The Wednesday Five

August 12, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Artist Margaret Kilgallen and the heroines she portrays in her compositions, Zehra Naqvi writes beautifully about her rejection of and return to the hijab, a program for women to employ poor women by translating for the sick, Meryl Streep’s screenwriters program selects inaugural participants, and writer Kate Angus explores a Native American legend and its lessons on hunger and desire in a failed relationship.

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Talk Topic: Donald Trump, Megyn Kelly and Reproductive Matters

August 11, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Within a matter of days we’ve seen two disparate developments, which both relate to the female reproductive system. The frontrunner for the Republican nomination for president verbally attacked a female journalist with a remark that many people interpreted as him saying she was “hormonal.” And, three major companies and the Navy announced expansions of their paid maternity leave benefits.

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She Remembers His Helping Hand: Frank Gifford Gave Her a Chance, and She Made a Life

August 10, 2015 by Melissa Ludtke

Monday Night Football commentator Frank Gifford is shown posing for the camera while sitting in the end zone of a football field

By Melissa Ludtke

A friend of mine died yesterday. He was 84 years old. We hadn’t seen each other in at least three decades, maybe longer. But that’s beside the point: I will always think of Frank Gifford as my friend. Here’s why: Frank saw potential in me when I didn’t see much in myself and he reached out a hand to help me discover it.

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The Wednesday Five: Best Longreads of the Week

August 5, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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This week, our longform list includes a shout out to the following articles: importance of women’s voices to the genre of travel writing, an extensive interview with the NASA scientist designing the parachute for the MARS Rover, comedian Tig Notaro on having cancer, making her new documentary and rebuilding after trauma, a salute to Marlene Sanders, pioneer in broadcast journalism, and a series of panels on technology with only women as speakers.

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The Wednesday Five: Pioneering Women

July 22, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Becky Hammon is the first woman to lead an NBA team, author Toni Morrison on her childhood friend who served as the inspiration for her book ‘The Bluest Eye,’ poet Ladan Osman on the ‘good literary citizen,’ Neil deGrasse Tyson on teaching our children enough science, and a tribute to Margaret Hamilton whose software guided Apollo 11 to the moon.

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Caitlyn Jenner’s ESPY Speech Provides a Lesson in Acceptance

July 17, 2015 by Pat Kinney

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By Pat Kinney

The acceptance speech by Caitlyn Jenner, the transgender woman who most of us first came to know as Olympic decathlon champion Bruce Jenner, will be remembered for what she taught us about being different.

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The Wednesday Five: Cover Women

July 15, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Body-positive statements from the women athletes featured in ESPN’s “The Body” issue; Sports Illustrated honors all 25 players of the U.S. women’s soccer team by giving each their own cover; Viola Davis and Jane Fonda talk about giving a cultural face to women on television; Junot Diaz on men who write about women; and the women steering NASA’s mission to Pluto.

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The Wednesday Five

July 8, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

Frida Kahlo's self portrait.

How to be like Frida Kahlo, as told by Frida Kahlo; the Dalai Lama on aging gracefully; Instagram’s policing of women’s bodies; the SCOTUS marriage-equality decision in Haiku; and the Nina Simone documentary streams on Netflix.

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At 40, Christie Rampone is Oldest Women’s Soccer Player in a World Cup Final

July 6, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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Last month, at age 39, Christie Rampone became the oldest player to appear in a World Cup game, when the United States defeated Nigeria, 1-0. She had her 40th birthday on June 24 and became the oldest women’s soccer player to ever appear in a World Cup final.

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“I’m A Work in Progress”: Rage and Forgiveness, 150 Years After Abolition

July 4, 2015 by Thulani Davis

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By Thulani Davis

What we have all seen since the shooting in June in Charleston is that the spiritual practice of that congregation is no work in progress; they are way ahead of us. They have shown that forgiveness, which is often taken for weakness in this culture, is a necessary tool to keep up the good fight that life requires.

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America the Beautiful

July 4, 2015 by Women's Voices For Change

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It was the glorious view from Pikes Peak, back in 1893, that inspired a poem penned by Catherine Lee Bates that would become our national hymn.

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