Theater Review: Eve Ensler’s ‘In the Body of the World’ — When the V-Word Meets the C-Word

June 27, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

While she was working tirelessly to open a sanctuary for Congolese rape victims, Eve Ensler was diagnosed with stage 3-4 uterine cancer. Thus began a journey that included self-recrimination (Did she ignore warning signs? Did she somehow poison her body through choices she made or didn’t make?), navigation through our country’s medical machine, making peace with her own family and history, and eventually finding a new way to connect to her body and to the world.

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Park Production Mocks the Misogyny in ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ (In the News)

June 21, 2016 by Women's Voices For Change

How do you make Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew” palatable to contemporary women? You play it this way.

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The Wednesday Five: Women of the 2016 Tony Awards

June 15, 2016 by Women's Voices For Change

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In this week’s Wednesday Five, we share with you our favorite award-acceptance speeches and performances from the storied Tony Awards. These women and their performances this season were, as fellow actress Audrey McDonald beautifully declared, “intelligent, resonant, and vibrant.”

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Theatre Preview: James Joyce’s ‘The Dead’ Comes to Life Next Winter

April 12, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

By Alexandra MacAaron

In a world premiere eight-week run from mid-November until early-January, a limited number of audience members will have the opportunity not just to watch “The Dead,” but to attend the story’s party themselves. The production will be set in a gracious turn of the century mansion on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue, the home of the American Irish Historical Society.

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Women Over 40 Take Their Turn and Sing Out in Third Annual ‘Tomatoes Got Talent’

March 11, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

By Alexandra MacAaron

On Sunday afternoon, twelve fearless — and enormously talented — singers “of a certain age” will step up to the microphone to compete in the Third Annual “Tomatoes Got Talent” cabaret contest at New York’s Triad Theatre.

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Becca Yuré: A Woman Who Is Making a Difference

January 19, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

Thanks to the work of the Theatre Development Fund (TDF) and, specifically, a remarkable woman named Becca Yuré, some of Broadway’s most beloved shows have been made available to a wider audience.

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‘Allegiance,’ Rarely-Told History Repeats Itself on Broadway

January 5, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

Along with the wonderful acting and singing, the staging of ‘Allegiance’ is particularly clever. Rough wood has been fashioned into sliding Japanese screens, effectively conveying the elegance of the family’s past with the austerity of their present. Projections are used at various points to add to the story and are especially effective when the characters learn of Hiroshima.

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Entertainment Guide: Savor the Holiday Season in the Big Apple

December 8, 2015 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

With all due respect to Grandmother’s house (“Over the river and through the woods”), no destination does the holiday season quite like New York City. The city’s “Great White Way” is especially exciting during the holidays.

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Sojourner Truth: Let Us Now Praise Extraordinary Women

September 27, 2015 by Deborah Harkins

Portrait of Sojourner Truth in 1850.

By Deborah Harkins

“Sojourner Truth was an architect of democracy as we know it! She was the first black woman feminist ever!” the opera director mused. “I started to get grumpy—Who has tucked this woman under the coffee table, and why have they done it?”

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The New Musical ‘Waitress’— A Bittersweet Slice of Heaven

August 18, 2015 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

“Waitress” was (and is) a wonderful little movie. “Little” in the sense of quiet and intimate, no huge stars, no special effects. It is bittersweet (especially when you think about Shelly’s untimely death), yet it remains a celebration of motherhood and sisterhood, of staying true to yourself or finding yourself again if you’ve lost your way.

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An Immigrant Story: Broadway’s ‘Hamilton’ Opens this Week

August 4, 2015 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

‘Hamilton’ is a genius synthesis of historical and contemporary politics, human passion, strength and tragic flaw.

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The 2015 Tony Awards: Winners, Losers, and a Surprising Snub

June 2, 2015 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

The Tony Awards aren’t usually as glamorous as the Oscars; there’s typically less cleavage—not to mention less Botox—on the red carpet. But what it lacks in glitz and glitter it makes up for in sincere appreciation of craft.

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Where Are All the Stage Mothers? (Maternal Roles Get Short Shrift in the Theater)

May 5, 2015 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

Historically, both straight plays and musicals have been a little biased when it comes to maternal characters.

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Betty Buckley: “I Forgot to Get My Cutting Horse”

January 13, 2015 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

Singer/actress Betty Buckley finds riding horses a good antidote to life in the limelight. “Horses are very spiritual,” she says. “They have an incredible emotional bond with human beings; there’s a tremendous, profound empathy between horses and humans that is very healing.” This is a refreshing contrast to a career in an industry filled with pigeonholing, constant judgment, and gossip.

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Betty Buckley’s New “Ghostlight” Is a Hauntingly Beautiful Homecoming

December 9, 2014 by Alexandra MacAaron

Click here to purchase on Amazon.com. Proceeds from your purchase help fund Women’s Voices‘ nonprofit mission.

By Alexandra MacAaron

“Ghostlight” is a disarmingly intimate collection of songs, spanning several decades and a breadth of genres—a carefully curated mix ranging from Irving Berlin to Mary Chapin Carpenter, Jacques Brel to Tom Waits. It was designed to transport you to “a mysterious, smoky place.”

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