The Wednesday Five

September 28, 2016 by Women's Voices For Change

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In this week’s Wednesday Five: Our picks for riveting biographies and memoirs about the brilliant and revolutionary lives of 20th and 21st century women.

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Grace Visits: Artist Mimi Smith

September 28, 2016 by Grace Graupe-Pillard

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By Grace Graupe-Pillard

The visual elegance and allure of Mimi Smith’s work often belies the startling dichotomy between the object and the inscribed words. Her language is both comical and deadly serious, compelling the viewer to question any easy assumptions that they might have had concerning the issues that she tackles.

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Movie Review: ‘Bridget Jones’s Baby’ Delivers as Expected

September 27, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

It’s been 15 years since ‘Bridget Jones’s Diary’ and 12 years since ‘Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason.’ That’s quite a long time between sequels. So one has to wonder, does ‘Bridget Jones’s Baby’ deliver? It depends.

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Poetry Sunday: ‘Seventh-Inning Sermon,’ by Chiyuma Elliot

September 25, 2016 by Rebecca Foust

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By Rebecca Foust

‘Seventh-Inning Stretch’ by Chiyuma Elliot knocks it out of the park with six tercets of incantatory, biblical-sounding long lines that inspire the awe we feel towards any art (including, I’d maintain, baseball) at its apex.

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Vikander and Weisz Shine Brightly in ‘The Light Between Oceans’

September 20, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

Director Derek Cianfrance is clearly invested in his material (he wrote the screenplay himself, based on the very successful first novel of M.L. Stedman). And, his sweeping vistas of the island and the surrounding waters take your breath away. He has also pulled very strong performances out of his fine cast (especially from Alicia Vikander and Rachel Weisz).

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Poetry Sunday: ‘Word Pond,’ by Susan Kolodny

September 18, 2016 by Rebecca Foust

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The relationship between memory retrieval and creativity is explored in “Word Pond,” whose 16 lines are characteristic of Susan Kolodny’s poetry in their taut suspension of few sharply drawn images such as the mossy pond and the broken watch.

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Kamala Lopez, A Woman Who Is Making A Difference

September 13, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

By Alexandra MacAaron

In the documentary “Equal Means Equal,” writer, director, producer Kamala Lopez walks us through a dozen disturbing issues that women face today and the failure of our nation to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Drawing on the day’s headlines, I asked her about Chessy Prout, the brave young woman who has come forward as the heretofore-anonymous rape victim at St. Paul’s prep school. In her passionately outspoken way, Lopez quickly broadened the question.

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Poetry Sunday: ‘Tangerine Orchids,’ by Rachel Hadas

September 11, 2016 by Rebecca Foust

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Perhaps it is the very unlikelihood of finding a connection between tropical flowers and 9/11 that allowed the image to penetrate the speaker’s subconscious. She manages both to acknowledge her own pain and also to give it its proper weight in the larger scope of the tragedy.

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Movie Review: ‘Equal Means Equal’ — An Idea Long Overdue

September 6, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

In her ambitious film, ‘Equal Means Equal,’ Kamala Lopez points out that “72% of Americans are completely invested in the false belief that the genders are explicitly equal under the U.S. Constitution.”

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Poetry Sunday: ‘Coy Mistress,’ by Annie Finch

September 4, 2016 by Rebecca Foust

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By Rebecca Foust

So, the opening salvo is a powerful one, and with it the speaker reveals herself to be smart, competent, and truly the mistress of this situation; in other words, the very opposite of the stereotypical demure, falsely reluctant woman barely seen in Andrew Marvel’s poem.

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Grace Visits: Artist Robin Tewes

August 31, 2016 by Grace Graupe-Pillard

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By Grace Graupe-Pillard

Robin Tewes believes that “[T]here is a need for men to be fragile and vulnerable with each other . . . usually they are not portrayed that way in art history. . . ” In her series of paintings, drawings and mixed media works, “Men In Trouble,” men are metaphorically engulfed in water — either drowning, or in a ritual of purification, transitioning from one state of awareness to another.

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TV Preview: The Small Screen Offers Big Roles for Women

August 30, 2016 by Alexandra MacAaron

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By Alexandra MacAaron

A quick look at the TV shows premiering this fall is so encouraging. On the small screen, the broadcast networks have stepped up with several new titles that center around a female protagonist.

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When Women Invest In Films About Women (In the News)

August 30, 2016 by Women's Voices For Change

With the film ‘Equity’ receiving wonderful reviews before its nationwide release on September 2, it is of note that the major investors in the film are also women.

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Blueprint for Happiness: The Photography of Joana Cardozo

August 29, 2016 by Suzanne Russell

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By Suzanne Russell

Photographing the streets of New York and its strange array of characters, Joana Cardozo fell in love with both New York City and photography. When it was time to go back to her law practice in Brazil, she decided instead to apply to a one-year intensive photography course at ICP. She told herself that if she were accepted, she would spend another year in New York. Joana was 36 years old at the time.

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Poetry Sunday: ‘Ghazanelle,’ by Moira Egan

August 28, 2016 by Rebecca Foust

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I very much admire this poem for its inventiveness and elegance of execution. Besides its intricate and seemingly effortless fusion of a ghazal, a villanelle, and a sonnet, the form so perfectly fulfills its subject as to not feel in any way contrived or imposed, that is, does not creak, stall out, surprise, or otherwise inform us of its presence.

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