Volunteer Passion No. 4: A Tutor’s Tale

September 2, 2014 by Deborah Harkins

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This is the tale of a tutor (one of 11,000 in the Reading Partners program) who relishes the chance to help a child discover the transporting pleasure that reading can provide.

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Appalachian Voices: Power to the People!

July 22, 2014 by Deborah Harkins

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By Deborah Harkins

This, I guessed, was a small band of activists who had grit and optimism, given that they’re fighting so massive an opponent—the entrenched, politically powerful coal industry. I found myself wondering, “Who ARE those guys?”

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Dominique Browning: “Making a Difference in the Air We Breathe”

May 19, 2014 by Judith A. Ross

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Judith A. Ross

While what we do at home is important, “it’s not what is going to solve this [climate change] problem,” Dominique Browning says. “What will work is old-fashioned citizenship.”

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Jill Abramson’s Firing: The Old Double Standard at ‘The New York Times’?

May 15, 2014 by Women's Voices For Change

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When Jill Abramson became executive editor of “The New York TImes” in 2011, she said the promotion was like “ascending to Valhalla.” On Wednesday she was abruptly fired, for reasons that remain murky.

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Days of Their Lives: Sandy Wilbur, Forensic Musicologist

April 29, 2014 by Deborah Harkins

Sandy Wilbur

By Deborah Harkins

What IS musical plagiarism? Is a particular number of notes, strung in a certain order, the giveaway? Sandy Wilbur, forensic musicologist, says no; it’s more complicated than that.

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Days of Their Lives—Earth, Fire, Water: Jerolyn Morrison’s Dream Job

April 1, 2014 by Deborah Harkins

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By Deborah Harkins

Jerolyn and her fellow researchers tease out the details of the ancient Minoans’ domestic life through piecing together shattered objects, chemical analysis, experiments (like cooking demonstrations), and informed speculation. “We put these deposits together very slowly, very meticulously, to form a story about an archaeological deposit that’s been excavated,” she tells us.

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Those Radical Rosies: Keeping Their Stories Alive

February 11, 2014 by Deborah Harkins

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By Deborah Harkins

“It has taken a couple of generations for the belief in women’s competence to really sink in,” notes producer Elizabeth Hemmerdinger. “Women of my generation have it . . . women in their sixties. But younger women, the 35-year-olds, they’re absolutely certain. ‘Fighter pilot?’ they’ll say. ‘No problem!’”

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Opening Your Life to Magic

January 21, 2014 by Jennifer Cheyne

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By Jennifer Cheyne

Now that I’m not young, there is so much more “me” inside than there used to be. That primordial mom that we all psychically cling to is in there now. A file cabinet full of experience and self-knowledge, too. A woman needn’t seek support for her right to claim a moment as her own—she can make it so.

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Days of Their Lives: Louise Fili, Always Elegantissima

January 14, 2014 by Mariam Aldhahi

Louise Fili

By Mariam Aldhahi

By borrowing from the form of vintage Italian signs and advertisements, graphic designer Louise Fili maintains an elegant, classic feel that manages to ignite nostalgia in even the most devout modernist.

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Learning French at 50

January 1, 2014 by Jennifer Cheyne

Jennifer Cheyne. Graduation

By Jennifer Cheyne

It became kind of fun to recount the stories of my escapades and mishaps. I felt as if I lived in an “I Love Lucy” episode half the time, especially when I got my papers back with notes like, “I’m pretty sure this is a good point, but this sentence doesn’t actually mean anything in French.” Whoops!

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Thanksgiving in Tanzania: The Story of an Accidental Priest

November 28, 2013 by Deborah Harkins

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By Deborah Harkins

Rev. Dr. Sandra McCann has switched careers abruptly—and with some amazement—all through her life. Ask her how she happened to become a doctor, then a radiologist, then a priest, and she’ll say, with a touch of wonder, “I was taken by surprise!”

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Feminism: Katherine Spillar on the Good News

November 19, 2013 by Deborah Harkins

Katherine Spillar

By Deborah Harkins

“In the earliest days of ‘Ms. Magazine’, a majority of women did not identify as feminists, and women’s rights were debatable. In polite company you could still debate whether or not women should be equal! In polite company now you can’t have that debate.”

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Want to Be a Business Leader? Don’t Let “Mommy Math” Do You In

August 1, 2013 by Catherine D. Wood

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By Catherine D. Wood

I would like to help women with daughters who are in the financial industry—or any other—understand one of the reasons why we are losing the battle for “liberation,” the battle for which so many women fought in the sixties and seventies. One factor is the “arithmetic discussion” that so many couples seem to have when times are tough.

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Carol Lamberg: A Woman Who’s Made a Difference

July 27, 2013 by Deborah Harkins

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By Deborah Harkins

“It’s like putting a puzzle together—it’s exciting when you get it done,” says Carol Lamberg, executive director of the Settlement Housing Fund, which builds affordable housing in New York City. “The neat thing is that you get to see the buildings. They’re up, they’re clean, there’s no graffiti, they’re safe . . . they’re there for you to see, unlike work in other fields, where you wonder if you’ve really achieved anything.”

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Sarah Bouissou: Jumping into Life

July 16, 2013 by Deborah Harkins

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By Deborah Harkins

Mother or four young women, professional chef, biker, dancer, fund-raising hostess, patron of young musicians, Sarah Bouissou does it all. With grace.

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